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Fishing Regulations Guide

Fishing Guide
 

Printable Version

 

Table of Contents

New for 2014-2016 Fishing Seasons (Summary of major changes)

  • Reduction of the statewide daily and possession limit of crappie from 20 and 80 to 10 and 20 respectively.
  • Bowfishing season will run from April 1 through November 30 (expanded to include the months of April, October and November). Open water spearfishing season to run from May 1 through November 30 (expanded to include the months of October and November).
  • Modifications to the paddlefish season including - changing the hours open to snagging from 8 a.m.- 10 p.m. to 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; reducing the 36-hour notice to close the season to 24 hours; reducing the extended snag-and-release season from seven to four days; a new requirement that all paddlefish snagged and tagged must be removed from the river by 9 p.m. of each snagging day; a change in the days open to harvest by snagging from Wednesday through Saturday to Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday; and additional requirements to accompany a harvested fish.
  • The Red and Bois de Sioux rivers are now open to darkhouse spearfishing.
  • Elimination of lake-specific reduced panfish limits for Odland Dam.

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Licenses

These regulations are in effect for two years from April 1, 2014 through March 31, 2016. A fishing year is defined as April 1 of one calendar year through March 31 of the following calendar year. NOTE: In the event of emergency changes to the 2014-2016 proclamation, Game and Fish will alert the media and public and post new information on the Department’s website.

Licenses are valid for one year starting April 1 and ending March 31 of the following year. An angler must possess a valid fishing license for the respective season.

Residents and nonresidents age 16 and older need licenses. Residents under age 16 may take and possess a limit of fish without a fishing license. Any nonresident under age 16 may take and possess a limit of fish without a nonresident fishing license if accompanied by an individual possessing a valid fishing license.

Residency qualifications and a waiver of residency form are available on the Game and Fish website. Call 701-328-6300 for more information.

North Dakota residents who are on leave while on active duty with the United States military can fish without a license. Contact the Department for details.

Nonresident full-time students living in North Dakota, who are attending a state or tribal college, or a private institution of higher education, may qualify for purchasing resident fishing licenses. Contact the Department for details.

Some licenses are in the form of stamps. Stamps must be pasted to a fishing, hunting and furbearer certificate and signed in ink.

The fishing license (paper or electronic form) must be in the possession of the licensee at all times while fishing.

Free Fishing DaysResidents of North Dakota may fish without a resident fishing license on June 7 and June 8, 2014 and on June 6 and June 7, 2015.

License Fees
Type Amount
Resident Fishing, Hunting and Furbearer Certificate $1
Resident Individual $16
Resident Husband and Wife $22
Resident, 65 years or older $5
Resident, Totally or Permanently Disabled* $5
Resident, 50 percent or More Disabled Veteran* $5
Resident Combination License (16 years or older – includes fishing, small game, general game and habitat, and furbearer licenses) $50

Nonresident Fishing, Hunting and Furbearer Certificate $2
Nonresident Individual $45
Nonresident Husband and Wife $60
Nonresident 10 Days $35
Nonresident 3 Days $25
All paddlefish snaggers must possess a paddlefish tag in addition to a valid fishing license and certificate that may be required. A resident paddlefish tag is $10, a nonresident paddlefish tag is $25.50.
*Available only from the Department’s Bismarck office.

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Fish and Bait Definitions

Game fish are bluegill, burbot, channel catfish, chinook salmon, crappie (black and white), largemouth bass, muskellunge (pure and hybrid), northern pike, paddlefish, sauger, saugeye, smallmouth bass, sturgeon (pallid, shovelnose and lake), trout (brown, lake, rainbow and cutthroat), walleye, white bass, yellow perch and zander.

Nongame fish are all species that inhabit and reproduce in the state’s waters that are not listed above as game fish.

Legal live baitfish are fathead minnows, creek chubs, sticklebacks and white sucker (Red and Bois de Sioux rivers only).

Other legal live bait includes all amphibians, insects and/or other invertebrates or parts thereof.

Prepared baitfish include any nongame fish (including legal live baitfish) which have been preserved by freezing, salting or otherwise treated to inactivate reproductive products. Prepared baitfish are legal bait. Nongame fish (including legal live baitfish), which have been reduced to sections, pieces or parts thereof are considered cut fish and are legal.
  Yellow perch eyes, and trout and salmon eggs are legal bait. The use of other game fish or parts thereof is illegal.

Manufactured and biodegradable bait are products manufactured as edible fishing bait and other inert biodegradable substances and are considered legal bait.

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Possession and Transportation of Fish and Bait

Transportation of any live fish, live fish eggs, live amphibians or other live aquatic organisms is illegal except for:

  • Anglers transporting legal live baitfish and bait (see below).
  • Dealers and buyers of tropical fish species for the pet trade sold at commercial outlets.
  • Individuals in possession of the appropriate license or permit from the Game and Fish director.

Baitfish and Bait (also see Section 6)

It is illegal to possess, or possess with intent to sell, or to use as live baitfish any species other than fathead minnows, creek chubs, sticklebacks and white suckers. The penalty for fishing with or possession of an illegal live baitfish is $250.

It is illegal to possess more than an aggregate of 150 legal live baitfish (i.e., fathead minnows, creek chubs, sticklebacks and white suckers). See page 16 for list of limits for all bait.

Absolutely no live baitfish may be used or possessed while on the following waters:

Water Area County
Belfield Pond Stark
Blumhardt Dam McIntosh
Bylin Dam/Dougherty Dam Walsh
Camels Hump Dam Golden Valley
Crown Butte Morton
Custer Mine Pond McLean
Davis Dam Slope
Dickinson Dike Stark
Fish Creek Morton
Harmon Lake Morton
Indian Creek Hettinger
Kettle Lake Williams
Leland Dam McKenzie
Lightning Lake McLean
McDowell Dam Burleigh
Mott Watershed Hettinger
Nelson Lake Oliver
North Lemmon Dam Adams
Nygren Dam Morton
Raleigh Reservoir Grant
Sather Dam McKenzie
Sheep Creek Dam Grant
Velva Sportsmen’s Pond Ward

For the Red River and Bois de Sioux rivers up to the first vehicular bridge or crossing on any of their tributaries: legal live baitfish are fathead minnows, creek chubs, sticklebacks and white suckers.

Statewide – in all other water bodies of North Dakota (not listed on page 9), the only legal live baitfish are fathead minnows, creek chubs and sticklebacks. Exception – rainbow smelt may be taken on the Missouri River System; however, all smelt taken must be dead when transported.

Legal live baitfish and other legal live bait may be transported in water but only in containers of five gallons or less.

No live aquatic organisms may be imported into the state by anglers.

All legal live aquatic organisms used by anglers, including legal baitfish (e.g. fathead minnows), amphibians (e.g. salamanders and frogs), invertebrates (e.g. crayfish and leeches) and insects must have been purchased or trapped in North Dakota.

Game and Nongame Fish

See pages 16 and 17 for list of limits, by species.

The daily creel limit is defined as the maximum number of legally taken fish (by species) that may be harvested from midnight to midnight. No individual may harvest or possess more than North Dakota’s daily limit of fish while on the water or the ice or actively engaged in any manner of fishing.

The possession limit is defined as the maximum number of legally taken fish (by species) that an individual may have in their actual possession during any phase of any single fishing trip of more than one day.

At no time may an individual transport more than a possession limit without written approval of the director.

The storage limit at one’s permanent residence is unlimited.

No fish species may be transported in water away from the water body from which they were taken. Ice in a cooler or other container may be used in transporting fish.

It is illegal to take, possess or transport any of the following species of fish in North Dakota (they must be immediately released back into the water from which they were caught): pallid sturgeon, shovelnose sturgeon, lake sturgeon and silver carp.

It is illegal to take paddlefish at any time except as provided on pages 26-28.

It is illegal to remove more than gills, entrails and scales from fish species harvested in waters that are subject to a size limit while on the water or actively engaged in fishing. It is illegal to remove more than the gills and entrails (head, fillets and tail must be attached) from channel catfish east of ND Highway 1 while on the water, actively engaged in fishing, transporting or until the fish are at the license holder’s permanent residence.

No individual possessing any game fish species may waste, destroy or abandon the edible flesh (fillets).

Any fish, including parts thereof that are transported must be packaged in such a manner that the number of fish in each package is easily determined.

Any fish (whole and/or fillets) may be given (gifted) to another individual, but the fish must be counted in the donor’s daily limit.

Gifted fish, including packages of fish, must be accompanied with the following information from the individual gifting the fish: name, fishing license number, phone number, date, species and number of fish gifted.

Example of required information when gifting (giving) fish to another
Name: Pat Angler
Fishing License Number:
Phone Number: 701-000-0000
Species Gifted: Walleye
Number Gifted: 10
Date: 5/1/2014

Except for legally gifted fish, it is illegal to possess or transport another individual’s game fish or parts thereof without the license holder accompanying or as otherwise permitted.

Commercial processors, common carriers, and common storage areas may possess any individual’s legally taken possession limit of fish. Each package must be labeled with the owner’s name and address.

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General Regulations

Stocking of any live fish, live fish eggs, live amphibians, or other live aquatic organisms into any waters of the state is illegal except with the appropriate license or permit issued by the Game and Fish director.

No individual shall sell or take for the purpose of sale any fish except as allowed in bait or commercial fishing laws.

Depositing or leaving any litter (including refuse, bottles, cans, etc.) or other waste material in the water, on the shore or on the ice is illegal.

It is illegal to deposit, or cause to be deposited, any fish or parts thereof, upon the ice, in the water, or upon the shore of any water body in North Dakota.

It is illegal to introduce anything into waters of the state for the purpose of attracting fish that is not attached or applied to a lure as defined on page 17. Decoys used for darkhouse spearfishing are excluded.

It is illegal to fish with any spring, lever, chemically, electrically, or mechanically actuated hook at any time. The use of any mechanical device to automatically retrieve the fish is also illegal.

Other than landing a fish caught on hook and line equipment, netting or trapping fish is illegal except for bait as denoted on page 13.

The director may make reasonable accommodations to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

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Bait Regulations

No live aquatic organisms may be imported into the state by anglers.

All individuals selling live bait must possess a bait vendor’s license.

Any container (e.g. bait bucket) used to hold bait must be free of aquatic vegetation.

Each licensed angler may use no more than one minnow trap and/or one dip net for taking smelt or legal live bait. The trap may not exceed 12 inches in diameter and 30 inches in length with a throat opening not to exceed 1-1/4 inches. Dip nets may not exceed 24 inches in diameter or 36 inches in depth. All other nets (e.g. cast) are ILLEGAL.

Legal live bait and legal live baitfish may be taken in all public waters of the state and at all times except for the following:

  • hose water bodies listed on page 9 as “no live baitfish” lakes.
  • Water bodies designated as infested with prohibited or regulated aquatic nuisance species (see North Dakota Game and Fish Department website at gf.nd.gov for current list of lakes).
  • Exception – rainbow smelt may be taken on the Missouri River System; however, all smelt taken must be dead when transported.

It is illegal to use live rainbow smelt for bait anywhere except for: live smelt captured with a dip net or by hand in the Garrison Dam Tailrace and used only in the Tailrace from the Garrison Dam downstream to the southern boundary of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Downstream Recreation Area.

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Manner of Taking

Taking or attempting to take fish from North Dakota waters is limited to those methods listed below. Subsequent pages provide regulation details.

Note – Manners of taking other than listed in this section such as “jugging,” “noodling,” and use of trot (set) lines are illegal.

Hook and Line Fishing

Open Areas and Season Dates

Area Season
ALL WATERS of the state except for those listed below and on page 15. Open to all fishing April 1 through March 31 of each fishing year.
OWLS Pond State Fair Pond Closed to fishing at night (sunset to sunrise).
Lightning Lake McDowell Dam State Fair Pond Open to all open-water fishing. Closed to all ice fishing.
Portions or all of the following waterfowl rest areas: Mount Carmel, North Golden Lake, Sheyenne Lake Closed to all fishing September 20 through November 30 or when conditions allow for ice fishing (whichever comes first). Open to all fishing all other times.
All national wildlife refuges and easement national wildlife refuges are closed to fishing except the following (contact refuge headquarters for designated open areas and special restrictions):
Arrowwood, J. Clark Salyer, Lake Darling (and all waters within the Upper Souris refuge boundary), Lake Ilo, Long Lake and Tewaukon national wildlife refuges. Open to shore and/or ice fishing April 1 through March 31 of each fishing year in designated areas. Open to boat fishing May 1 through September 30 of each fishing year in designated areas. Closed to all boating April 1 through April 30 and October 1 through March
Lake Audubon National Wildlife Refuge (southern half of lake) Open to ice fishing only. Closed to all other fishing and all boating.
Dakota Lake, Hobart Lake, and Sibley Lake (Griggs County) easement national wildlife refuges Open to all fishing April 1 through September 30 and December 1 through March 31 of each fishing year. Closed to all fishing and boating October 1 through November 30.
Lake Ardoch, Rose Lake, and Silver Lake (Benson County) easement national wildlife refuges Open to shore and/or ice fishing from April 1 through March 31 of each fishing year. Closed to all boating year-round.
Closed to Fishing
  • The Red River below the Drayton Dam for a distance of 150 feet.
  • From or within 100 feet of the bridge located between North and South Lake Metigoshe.
  • Areas near the Garrison Dam Tailrace so posted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • No individual shall fish or boat in areas posted and designated by the Game and Fish Department.

Statewide Daily and Possession Limits

SPECIES DAILY LIMIT POSSESSION LIMIT
Walleye, Sauger, Saugeye or Combination (a) 5 10
Northern Pike 5 10
Yellow Perch 20 80
Bluegill 20 80
White Bass 20 80
Crappie 10 20
Trout 3 3
Salmon 5 10
Burbot (Ling) 10 20
Channel Catfish East of ND Hwy. 1 (b) 5 5
Channel Catfish West of ND Hwy. 1 no limit no limit
Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass or Combination 3 6
Muskellunge (pure or hybrid) 1 1
Paddlefish See pages 26-28  
Nongame Fish (other than legal live baitfish) no limit no limit
Legal Live Baitfish (c) 150 150
Smelt 5 gallons 5 gallons
Frogs 24 24
Salamanders 24 24
Crayfish 48 48
  • Zander are included as part of the walleye, sauger, saugeye combination in Spiritwood Lake.
  • In the Red and Bois de Sioux rivers, the limit is regardless of the number of state or provincial licenses purchased by the angler.
  • Aggregate of all legal species.

Exceptions to Statewide Fish Limits

Red and Bois de Sioux rivers up to the first vehicular bridge or crossing on any of their tributaries NORTHERN PIKE – Daily 3, Possession 3

WALLEYE, SAUGER, SAUGEYE OR COMBINATION – Daily 3, Possession 3

Lightning Lake TROUT – Catch and release only from April 1 through June 30
OWLS Pond and State Fair Pond ALL SPECIES – Catch and release only
Kraft Slough YELLOW PERCH – Daily 10, Possession 20
Lake Metigoshe BLUEGILL – Daily 10, Possession 20

See page 19 for fish size restrictions

Specific Regulation Information

Legal hook and line equipment for each angler is two poles statewide except:

One pole only is legal at:

Garrison Dam Tailrace (Missouri River) – while fishing from the piers and wingwalls.

Drayton Dam (Red River) – while shore-fishing between boat ramp and area designated “closed to fishing.”

Four poles are legal while ice fishing.

Note: When fishing a water body where both open water and ice fishing occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles of which no more than two poles can be used in open water. (See page 21 for additional ice fishing regulations.)

No pole may have more than two lures.

A lure is defined as any man-made object comprised of metal, plastic, wood and/or other nonedible materials made or used to catch fish. A lure may not contain more than three hooks and the maximum distance between any hooks on a lure may not exceed 10 inches. A single hook may not include more than three points, barbed or otherwise. Spinners and other live bait rigs and harnesses are considered a lure and are legal. Hookless dodgers or attractors used ahead of a lure or bait are legal.

An angler must remain within 150 feet of his/her fishing poles that are in active use for fishing. Fishing poles must be checked at least once per hour while fishing.

After catching on hook and line, it is legal to return all fish to the water at the site of capture if done no longer than the time needed to unhook, measure and/or photograph the fish immediately after being caught. Fish returned to the water should show no evidence of bleeding, be handled carefully, and not thrown or dropped. All fish released from bridges and wing-walls (e.g. Garrison Dam Tailrace) must be done immediately after being placed in a fish basket/open container to ensure fish survival.

High-grading or culling of fish is illegal. No fish may be returned to the water after being held on a stringer or confined by or in any type of holding structure, except in the case of approved live-release fishing tournaments and only with written permission from the Game and Fish director. No fish may be released into any waters other than the one from which it was originally caught.

A foul-hooked or snagged fish is defined as any fish hooked or caught in any area from behind the gill covers to the tail. Any foul-hooked or snagged fish must immediately be returned to the water regardless of condition. Possession of foul-hooked fish is illegal. Attempting to snag fish is illegal.

Landing a fish caught on hook and line equipment with aid of a gaff is legal except for sturgeon, paddlefish, muskellunge and species in waters in which there are size limits. No gaffed fish may be returned to the water.

It is illegal to tag or mark any fish prior to release.

Lake specific rules may exist and may be displayed by Department signage at access areas and bridges.

Fish Size Restrictions

All undersized or oversized fish caught where there is a size limit, must be returned to the water immediately regardless of condition and must be handled carefully to avoid injury.

It is illegal to remove more than gills, entrails and scales from fish species harvested in waters that are subject to a size limit while on the water or actively engaged in fishing.

It is illegal to remove more than the gills and entrails from channel catfish east of ND Highway 1 while on the water, actively engaged in fishing, transporting or until the fish is at the license holder’s permanent residence. Head, fillets and tail must be attached.

Water Areas It is Illegal to Take or Possess:
Anywhere in the state Muskellunge Less than 48 inches in total length
Lake Elsie, Lueck Lake, and West Moran Lake Richland Co.  
Alkali Lake, Buffalo Lake (including connected waters north to Sargent Co. Rd. 1), and Tosse Slough Sargent Co. Walleye/Sauger
Jamestown and Pipestem reservoirs upstream to and including the first bridge crossing Stutsman Co. Less than 14 inches in total length
North and South Golden lakes Steele Co.  
Red Willow Lake Griggs Co. Northern Pike Less than 24 inches in total length
North and South Golden lakes Steele Co. Largemouth Bass Less than 14 inches in total length
Red Willow Lake Griggs Co.  
All waters east of ND Highway 1 including the Red and Bois de Sioux rivers More than 1 Channel Catfish Greater than 24 inches in total length
 
To determine the total length of a fish, lay it flat on its side with its mouth closed and measure from the nose to the tip of the tail when the tail lobes are pressed together.
 

The following table is intended to assist an angler with a weight estimate based on the fish’s length. The table shows the average weights of select fish statewide. The true weight of an individual fish may vary due to the sex of the fish, time of the year (e.g., spawning) when it is caught, the health of the fish and the water body from which it is caught.

  Bluegill Yellow Perch White Bass Small-mouth Bass Large-mouth Bass Walleye Channel Catfish Northern Pike
Inches Estimated Pounds
6 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1      
7 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2      
8 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2    
9 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.3    
10 1 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.3 0.3  
11 1.3 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.8 0.4 0.4  
12 1.7 1 0.9 0.9 1 0.6 0.5 0.4
13   1.3 1.2 1.2 1.3 0.7 0.6 0.5
14   1.6 1.5 1.5 1.6 0.9 0.8 0.6
15   2 1.9 1.8 2 1.1 0.9 0.7
16     2.3 2.2 2.4 1.4 1.2 0.9
17     2.7 2.6 2.9 1.7 1.4 1.1
18     3.3 3.2 3.4 2 1.7 1.3
19     3.8 3.7 4.1 2.4 2.3 1.5
20     4.3 4.4 4.7 2.9 2.9 1.8
21       5.1 5.5 3.3 3 2.1
22       5.9 6.4 3.9 3.4 2.4
23       6.8 7.3 4.5 4 2.7
24       7.7 8.3 5.1 4.8 3.2
25           5.8 5.8 3.7
26           6.6 6.5 4.1
27           7.4 8.7 4.6
28           8.3 9.7 5.1
29           9.3 10.1 5.7
30           10.4 11.2 6.3
31           12.7 11.9 7
32             13.5 7.7
34             17 9.2
36             21 11
38             26 13
40               15.2
42               17.6
44               20.3
46               23.2
48               26.5
50               30

Ice Fishing Regulations

Ice fishing is defined as hook and line fishing that occurs while on the ice. See pages 14-15 for waters open to hook and line fishing.

A maximum of four poles is legal for ice fishing. However, when fishing a water body where both open water and ice occur at the same time, an angler is allowed a maximum of four poles, of which no more than two poles can be used in open water.

Tip-ups are legal for ice fishing. Each tip-up is considered a single pole.

There is no restriction on the size of the hole in the ice while ice fishing. When a hole greater than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice, the area in the immediate vicinity of the hole must be adequately marked with a natural object or a brightly painted or colored wooden lath. Markers must be visible from a minimum of 150 feet.

Fishing holes outside a fish house may be placed no closer than 10 feet from the house without consent of the fish house occupant.

As a guideline, anglers should consider the following as the minimum thickness for safe loads on ice:

Please note: The Game and Fish Department does not monitor ice thickness.
 

Please note: The Game and Fish Department does not monitor ice thickness.

Fish Houses

Licensing of fish houses is not required in North Dakota. However, any unoccupied fish house must have displayed on its outside in readily distinguishable characters at least three inches high, the owner’s name and address or the owner’s name and telephone number. Any unoccupied fish house left on the ice without having this proper identification may be removed or destroyed by the Department, and its owner is guilty of a class 2 noncriminal offense.

Unoccupied Structures
 

Any structure used as a fish house or darkhouse (to include campers) that is required to have the owner’s name and address or telephone number inscribed on it, shall be constructed of material that will allow it to float and be readily removable from the ice at any time.

Fish houses may be of any size and may be constructed with or without windows.

When in use, fish houses must be open for inspection at all times and hooks on doors are illegal.

Fish houses may be placed no closer than 50 feet in any direction from another fish house, without consent of the other fish house occupant.

Fish houses must be removed from all waters by midnight March 15 of each year. Fish houses may be used after March 15 if they are removed daily.

It is illegal to leave fish houses on any federal refuge land or on any state-owned or managed land after March 15 of each year.

Darkhouse Spearfishing

Northern pike and nongame fish are the only legal species for darkhouse spearfishing. Daily and possession limits are the same as listed on pages 16 and 17.

Darkhouse spearfishing is legal from December 1 through March 15 of each fishing year.

All waters open to hook and line fishing are open to darkhouse spearfishing except the following fishing waters which are closed:

  • Braun Lake – Logan Co.
  • East Park Lake – McLean Co.
  • Heckers Lake – Sheridan Co.
  • Lake Audubon – McLean Co.
  • McClusky Canal
  • New Johns Lake – Burleigh Co.
  • Red Willow Lake – Griggs Co.
  • Sweet Briar Lake – Morton Co.
  • West Park Lake – McLean Co.

In addition to possessing the needed valid fishing license, all individuals who participate in darkhouse spearfishing must first register on the Game and Fish Department website (http://gf.nd.gov), or through any Department office, prior to participating.

It is illegal to return fish to the water after they are speared. Possession of a spear is counted as a hook-and-line fishing pole while darkhouse spearfishing. Legal darkhouse spear equipment shall be any manually powered shaft with barbed points. The spear head shall not exceed 12 inches in width. Pneumatic or rubber band powered spear guns may not be used. Artificials and all legal bait with the exception of live white sucker and rainbow smelt may be used as decoys. (Note: it is legal to use live white suckers as decoys on the Red and Bois de Sioux rivers up to the first vehicular bridge or crossing on any of their tributaries). Any line used for a decoy will be considered a hook-and-line fishing pole if a hook is attached to the line.

There is no restriction on the size of the ice hole while actively engaged in darkhouse spearfishing. When a hole greater than 10 inches in diameter is left in the ice when a darkhouse is moved, the area in the immediate vicinity of the hole must be adequately marked by the spearer with a natural object or a brightly painted or colored wooden lath. Markers must be visible from a minimum of 150 feet.

Archery and Spearfishing

Game fish may not be taken with bow/arrows or spears.

It is illegal to return fish to the water after they are shot or speared. All fish must be used and/or disposed of properly and not left in the water or on land.

Archery fishing is legal from April 1 through November 30 of each fishing year.

Spearfishing is legal from May 1 through November 30 of each fishing year.

Archery and spearfishing is open in all waters as specified on pages 14-15, except for the following areas which are closed:

  • That portion of the Missouri River from the Garrison Dam downstream to the southern boundary of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Downstream Recreation Area.

Legal archery equipment is any bow to which an arrow is attached by a line and equipped with a harpoon style point or wire-barbed point. The use of night vision equipment or electronically enhanced light-gathering optics including all lights used for locating and shooting at fish is legal. Crossbows are prohibited except with a special director’s permit that may be issued if an individual is permanently disabled.

Legal spear equipment is any manually powered shaft with barbed points. The spear head shall not exceed 12 inches in width.

Underwater Spearfishing

The following fish may not be taken with underwater spearfishing gear: muskellunge, paddlefish, smallmouth bass and sturgeon. All other species are legal. Daily and possession limits for legal fish are the same as listed on page 16.

Underwater spearfishing is legal from May 1 through November 30 of each fishing year.

Underwater spearfishing is open only in the following waters:

  • The Missouri River except that portion from the Garrison Dam downstream to the southern boundary of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Downstream Recreation Area.
  • Lake Oahe, Lake Sakakawea (except those areas posted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers near the intake and spillway structures) and the open fishing areas of Lake Audubon.
  • Devils Lake and Stump Lake.
  • Spiritwood Lake.

Legal underwater spear equipment is a rubber band powered or pneumatic powered spear gun with the spear attached to the gun with a lanyard not to exceed 20 feet. Underwater spears may be discharged only when the operator and equipment are entirely under the surface of the water.

Underwater spearfishing is illegal within 150 feet of any individuals engaged in fishing, designated swimming or water ski areas, boat docks or spillways.

The Diver’s Down Flag must be displayed on a float or buoy during any underwater spearfishing. Underwater spearers must stay within 100 feet of the vertical position of their Diver’s Down Flag. Individuals who underwater spearfish between sunset and sunrise must display a lighted Diver’s Down Flag and must carry a hand-held light that is visible from a distance of 150 feet. The handheld light must be displayed when the diver is at the surface.

Paddlefish Snagging

Paddlefish
 

Snagging of paddlefish is legal May 1 through May 31 for those with a valid paddlefish tag. The open area includes the Yellowstone River in North Dakota, and the Missouri River west of the U.S. Highway 85 bridge to the Montana border, excluding that portion from the pipeline crossing (river mile 1,577) downstream to the upper end of the Lewis and Clark WMA (river mile 1,565). Paddlefish snagging is legal only from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Central Time) during each day of the paddlefish snagging season. Select days are set aside for harvest, and release only.

All paddlefish snaggers must obtain and have in their possession a valid paddlefish tag, in addition to a fishing license and certificate that may be required. Only one tag per snagger will be issued and the tag is not transferable to another individual. Any paddlefish tag that is locked shut prior to attachment, altered or modified shall be voided and will not be replaced.

It is illegal for an individual to use fish snagging equipment in the paddlefish area if that individual does not possess his/her own unused paddlefish tag. Each paddlefish snagger must cast for, hook and reel in (retrieve) his/her own fish. The use of more than one snag hook per line is illegal. Snagging from a boat is illegal. It is illegal to gaff any species other than paddlefish, and paddlefish may only be gaffed on “snag and harvest days.”

The sale, barter, trade or purchase of paddlefish eggs is legal only for one qualified and properly permitted paddlefish caviar operation.

All fish delivered to and/or processed fish transported away from the caviar operation must be done so by either the individual who snagged the fish or an approved individual working for the permitted paddlefish caviar operation. Any fish left at the caviar operation after 10 p.m. the day they were caught will be considered abandoned and the snagger is subject to a fi ne.

All paddlefish snagged and tagged must be removed from the river by 9 p.m. of each snagging day.

Depending on the overall harvest, an “in-season” closure may occur, with a 24-hour notice issued by the Game and Fish director. If this occurs, there will be no refunds for unused tags. If there is an early closure, snag-and-release-only will still be allowed for a four-day period immediately following the harvest closure, but not to extend beyond May 31. Notice of an early closure and subsequent days set aside for snag-and-release-only will be issued by a special news release from the Department. Once a snagger harvests a paddlefish, they can no longer snag for paddlefish at any subsequent time during the current season (including snag-and-release-only and extended snag-and-release-only days).

Harvest-Only Days are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays

On these days, all paddlefish caught must be tagged immediately with one’s own tag. Season creel limit is one paddlefish. The release of paddlefish after snagging is illegal. If a fish is cut up, the tag must accompany the dressed fish either by attachment to the bag containing the dressed fish or by placement within the bag. The snagger must keep that portion of the back and dorsal fi n (back fi n) necessary to maintain the tag sealed to the fish.

Snag-and-Release-Only days are Sundays, Mondays and Thursdays

If snaggers have in possession their own unused and current year’s paddlefish tag, they can snag but must release immediately any and all paddlefish snagged on each Sunday, Monday and Thursday throughout the open season. No harvest of any paddlefish is allowed during these days. There is no limit on the number of fish that can be snagged during the day. The use or possession of a gaff on snag-and-release days is illegal.

Extended Snag-and-Release-Only Days

If the harvest season closes early, snag-and-release will be allowed for up to four days immediately following the harvest closure, but not to extend beyond May 31.

If snaggers have in possession their own unused and current year’s paddlefish tag, they can snag but must release immediately any and all paddlefish snagged during the extended season. Snag-and-release will be open only in that area of the Missouri River starting on the north shore from the Confluence boat ramp then east (downstream) one-half mile, and that area of the Missouri River starting on the south shore from the Confluence with the Yellowstone River then east (downstream) one half mile. No harvest of any paddlefish will be allowed during these days and all snagged fish must be released immediately. There is no limit on the number of fish that can be snagged during the day. The use or possession of a gaff on snag-and-release days is illegal.

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Red and Bois De Sioux Rivers

Individuals fishing the Red River and/or the Bois de Sioux River in a boat or on the ice who possess a valid fishing license from either North Dakota or Minnesota may fish the river(s) between the banks of the river separating North Dakota and Minnesota. Individuals fishing the Red River and/or the Bois de Sioux River on the shoreline must have a valid fishing license from the state in which they are fishing. Those individuals possessing the correct, valid license may transport caught fish by the most convenient and direct route to the state in which they are licensed. All anglers and boaters are required to comply with aquatic nuisance/invasive species and fish and bait transport regulations of the state they are in, except while on the water or ice, anglers must comply with the regulations of the state for which they are licensed. (NOTE: this includes those who are not required to have a license).

From the Red and Bois de Sioux rivers (as well as all waters east of ND Highway 1) – the daily and possession limit on catfish is five (including only one catfish that may exceed 24 inches) regardless of the number of state or provincial licenses purchased by the angler.

From the Red and Bois de Sioux rivers up to the first vehicular bridge or crossing on any of their tributaries – the daily and possession limit for walleye, sauger, saugeye or combination is three. The daily and possession limit for northern pike is three.

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Aquatic Nuisance Species Rules and Questions/Answers

Aquatic nuisance species are animals, plants and even diseases that are not native to North Dakota and have the likelihood to become well established if introduced. They can displace native plants and animals, and cause serious economic and ecological damage. North Dakota has adopted a number of rules designed to minimize the threat of ANS. They include:

  1. All water must be drained from boats and other watercraft, including bilges, livewells and motors before leaving a water body. This regulation means that harvested fish, legal live baitfish and other aquatic baits may not be transported in a livewell containing water after leaving a water body. Transportation of fish in or on ice is allowed. Potable (drinking) water and a boat’s sewage water are excluded from this regulation. Water used for in-state transportation of legal live bait is allowed, but only in bait buckets (containers) no larger than five gallons.
  2. All aquatic vegetation must be removed from boats, personal watercraft, trailers and associated equipment such as fishing poles/lures before leaving a body of water. That means “vegetation free” when transporting watercraft and equipment including bait buckets away from a boat ramp, landing area or shoreline.
  3. Live aquatic bait or aquatic vegetation may not be transported into North Dakota.
  4. All water must be drained from watercraft prior to entering the state. It is in North Dakota’s best interest that anglers, boaters and hunters understand and comply with these important regulations.

The following questions and answers are intended to provide additional insight into this vital matter. All aquatic vegetation must be removed from boats, motors, trailers and equipment before leaving a lake or river.

Why are ANS such a big deal?

ANS can greatly degrade or ruin habitats and compete with native and/or desirable species for food and space. Not only can recreational fisheries suffer but so can industries and communities that rely on lakes or rivers for their water supply. Once established, the cost of controlling the ANS would far exceed the minimal costs required to keep from spreading it into or within North Dakota.

Can ANS spread be stopped?

If precautions are taken and everyone follows them, the spread can be controlled. But it requires everyone’s participation.

How do I make sure I’m doing the right thing?

To comply with the regulations, you simply need to remove all aquatic vegetation from your boat, trailer, bait bucket, etc., when you leave the water body. You need to drain all water from your boat at the ramp site before you leave the water body. Also, remember you cannot dump bait into a water body.

Do I have to run my motor dry also before I leave a lake?

No. As you exit a lake, lower the motor to let gravity drain the lower unit, then raise to transport. The intake screen should also be inspected and free of aquatic vegetation.

Can I drain water from my boat anywhere?

No, you must drain the water (pull all plugs, etc.) back into the water from which it originated. This must be done at the access site before you leave.

What if I observe boats, trailers, jet skis, etc., that have weeds hanging from them away from a lake?

The best thing you can do is spread the word on the risk of ANS. If the boat owner/operator is present and willing, ask that they clean the boat and trailer. If the owner/operator is not cooperative call the RAP line.

Do I need to dispose of the weeds in a trash container or can they be left on the ground/parking lot?

Dispose of weeds back into the water from which they originated, to keep parking lots and access areas clean.

As a resident who lives on the North Dakota border, and the nearest bait vendor is across the border in another state, can I cross the state line to purchase bait and import it back into North Dakota?

No. Aquatic bait, including fathead minnows and leeches, may not be imported into North Dakota.

What else can I do to help prevent the spread of ANS?

You can disinfect your boat by adding hot water (120° F or warmer) to the livewell along with enough household chlorine bleach to reach a solution of 1 part bleach to 20 parts water. Run the recirculation pumps and use a brush (a toilet brush works well) to scrub under the lid and in the corners. Drain the solution in an appropriate location, not into the lake. Air drying can also be effective in preventing ANS transfer. The livewell, bilge and equipment must be allowed to completely dry, which may take a few days for the bilge. However, some ANS produce hardy seeds and eggs which can withstand extended periods out of the water; in these cases, air drying is not the answer. Power-washing can remove lake scum and unseen hitchhikers, such as small plant fragments or egg masses, from hard-to-reach places such as trailer frames and livewells. Use a commercial car wash that runs water through a sewage treatment system. If done at home, be careful that the wash water does not run down the street and into the storm sewer that empties into the local river or lake.

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Fishing Contests

No individual or entity may conduct a fishing contest on any public waters without first obtaining a permit issued by the Game and Fish director.

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Commercial Fishing

Noncontract type commercial fishing with use of seines, hoop nets and set lines may be allowed by special license in certain waters at certain times.

Contact the Department for licensing information and regulations.

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Commercial Take of Turtles Closed

Turtles may not be taken commercially in North Dakota due to population concerns.

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Clam Season Closed

The season on clams (freshwater mussels) remains closed in North Dakota due to continued concern over the impacts commercial harvest may have on clam populations.

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Fish Consumption Advisory

The North Dakota Department of Health has issued advisories for the consumption of fish from certain North Dakota lakes and rivers. These fish contain levels of mercury which may be harmful to certain segments of the population if they are eaten too often.

Information listing current consumption advice is available from the North Dakota Department of Health (Division of Water Quality) website at: http://www.ndhealth.gov/wq, or by calling 701-328-5210.

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Boat Motor Restrictions

Please check for signs at access points or call the Game and Fish Department. “Idle speed only” is defined as operating a boat at the slowest possible speed necessary to maintain steerage (i.e., trolling – with no wake).

Electric Motors Only: (Note: Boats may be propelled manually or with an electric motor. No combustion motor may be operated on these waters.) Casselton Reservoir, Davis Dam, Dickinson Dike, Heinrich-Martin Dam, J. Clark Salyer, Kettle Lake, Larimore Dam, Leland Dam, Lightning Lake, McDowell Dam, Mooreton Pond, Rudolph Lake, Sather Dam, Spring Lake Park Ponds, Strawberry Lake (Turtle Mountains).

Idle Speed Only: Arroda Lakes, Lake Audubon (north arm), Baukol-Noonan Dam, Baukol-Noonan East Mine Pond, Belfield Pond, Boundary Lake, Brewer Lake, Camels Hump Lake, Carbury Dam, Clausen Springs Lake, Coal Mine Lake, Crown Butte, Dion Lake, Epping- Springbrook Dam, Fish Creek Dam, Fordville Dam, Gravel Lake, Harmon Lake, Harmony Lake, Heart Butte (Lake Tschida) designated areas only, Hooker Lake, Lake Ilo, Indian Creek Dam, Jensen Lake, Kota-Ray Dam, Kraft Slough, McClusky Canal proper, McGregor Dam, Mirror Lake, North Golden Lake, Pelican Lake, Raleigh Reservoir, Sheep Creek Dam, South Carlson Lake, Sweet Briar Lake, and along the Missouri River at the mouths of the Heart River, Lakewood, Marina Bay, Misty Waters and Square Butte Creek.

25 Horsepower Maximum: Arrowwood, Jim Lake and Long Lake national wildlife refuges.

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Boating Regulations

Closed to fishing from boats: On the Bald Hill Creek, an area from the Wesley Acres Bridge downstream a distance of 1/2 mile. This area is closed to boat fishing from April 1 through May 24 of each fishing year.

Where signed at Devils Lake, boats used for fishing may not obstruct normal boat traffic underneath bridges.

See pages 14-15 for federal refuge boating closures.

  • An owner of any watercraft propelled by a motor must register that vessel with the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, or the state in which he/ she resides.
  • If your address changes, boat ownership changes, boat is destroyed, abandoned, stolen or recovered – you are required to notify the Department within 15 days.
  • The certificate of number is not transferable. Anyone purchasing a boat must register the boat in his/her name.
  • The Department can issue a new certificate of number to replace one that is lost. The cost is the same as for a new one.
  • No person under 12 years of age may operate a motorboat (includes personal watercraft, jetskis, etc.) propelled by a motor of more than 10 horsepower unless the operator is accompanied by a person 18 years of age or older.
  • No person 12 through 15 years of age may operate a motorboat or personal watercraft propelled by a motor of more than 10 horsepower unless the operator is accompanied by a person 18 years of age or older, or the operator has taken and passed a Department approved boating course.
  • All boats must have a Coast Guard approved life preserver for each occupant, and those boats over 16 feet in length must also have an approved throwable life preserver. Boat occupants age 10 and under must wear their life preserver.
  • No person may operate any vessel in a reckless or negligent manner such as:
    • Endangering the life or property of another.
    • Use of excessive speed during periods of reduced visibility or while in close proximity to other vessels.
    • Operating in overloaded condition.
    • Operating within swimming areas designated by markers or by the presence of swimmers.
    • Operating near dams and other hazardous waters.
    • Operating in such a manner as to cause a dangerous or damaging wake.
    • Operation in such a manner as to molest or annoy a person lawfully engaged in fishing.
  • No person may operate a motorboat (includes personal watercraft) within 100 feet of a person fishing from a shoreline, a swimmer, swimming/diving raft, or an occupied, anchored or nonmotorized vessel, or within 250 feet of a reduced speed or slow or nowake sign at greater than slow or no-wake speed.
  • No person may operate any motorboat or vessel while intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol or any narcotic drug, barbiturate or marijuana.
  • No person may operate or permit operation of a personal watercraft (jetskis, etc.) without each person on board wearing an approved life preserver.
  • All boats operating between sunset and sunrise must display legal lights.
  • The owner/operator of a vessel is required to file a report in writing whenever an accident results in loss of life or disappearance from a vessel, an injury which requires medical treatment beyond first aid, or property damage is in excess of $2,000 or complete loss of the vessel.
  • Reports in death and injury cases must be submitted within 48 hours.
  • Reports in other cases must be submitted within five days.

For more information on boating regulations and safety, contact the Game and Fish Department.

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Whopper/Catch and Release Club Requirements

Whopper Club

Only species listed and meeting minimum weight requirements will qualify for a patch and certificate. Only one application may be made for each species in a lifetime. Anglers receive a patch for the first whopper of a species, an Expert patch for a whopper of another species, and a Master patch for a whopper of a third species. After that only certificates will be awarded for whoppers of additional species. An application card must be filled out, giving weight and length of fish, date and where caught, signature of applicant, and signature of person weighing the fish. All fish entered must have been harvested by legal methods as described in the North Dakota fishing guide and come from North Dakota waters open to public fishing. Entries must be weighed on a scale used in trade.

Catch and Release Club

Eighteen species of fish qualify for the Catch and Release Club. Entries must meet minimum length requirements and be released unharmed back to the water. Another angler must witness and verify the measurement and release. Anglers will receive an official membership certificate and a choice of jacket patch or boat decal. A maximum of five entries per year per species will be recognized.

Whopper and Catch and Release Minimums
Species Minimum Whopper Club Minimum Catch and Release Club
Game Fish
Northern Pike 20 lbs. 32 inches
Walleye* 8 lbs 25 inches
Saugeye 8 lbs. 25 inches
Sauger 4 lbs. 20 inches
Yellow Perch 1 3/4 lbs. 13 inches
Bluegill 1 1/2 lbs. 11 inches
Crappie 1 1/2 lbs. 13 inches
White Bass 3 lbs. 16 inches
Largemouth Bass 5 lbs. 18 inches
Smallmouth Bass 3 lbs. 16 inches
Tiger Muskie 25 lbs. 40 inches
Muskellunge (Pure) 25 lbs. 40 inches
Channel Catfish 12 lbs. 30 inches
Ling 8 lbs. 28 inches
Rainbow Trout 5 lbs. 21 inches
Brown Trout 5 lbs. 21 inches
Cutthroat Trout 5 lbs. 21 inches
Lake Trout 5 lbs. 24 inches
Chinook Salmon 12 lbs.  
Paddlefish 70 lbs.  
Nongame Fish
Whitefish 4 lbs.  
Cisco 1 3/4 lbs.  
Bullhead 2 lbs.  
Drum 6 lbs.  
Buffalo 15 lbs.  
Carp 15 lbs.  
Goldeye 2 lbs.  

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North Dakota State Record Fish Requirements

  1. All recognized fish must be harvested by legal methods for recreational fishing and come from North Dakota waters that are open for public fishing.
  2. All new state record fish must be weighed on a scale used commercially and subject to certification by the North Dakota Public Service Commission. All weights must be rounded to the nearest ounce.
  3. The fish must be visually verified by an employee of the North Dakota Game and Fish Department.
  4. Angler must thoroughly complete and submit to the Department a Whopper card application or a handwritten or typed note with all similar information.
  5. A recognizable photo of the fish must be furnished to the Department.
  6. A fin sample may be required and collected for some species for genetic analysis.

First Fish Award

A FIRST FISH certificate is a great way to preserve a memory for a young angler. These colorful awards have space for photos and details of the memorable day. FIRST FISH certificates are available free by calling the Game and Fish Department at 701-328-6300; email at ndgf@nd.gov; or writing 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, ND 58501.

 
North Dakota Record Fish
Species Weight Where When
Game Fish
Northern Pike 37 lbs. 8 oz. Lake Sakakawea 1968
Walleye 15 lbs. 12 oz. Wood Lake 1959
Saugeye 12 lbs. 0 oz. Yellowstone River 2013
Sauger 8 lbs. 12 oz. Lake Sakakawea 1971
Yellow Perch 2 lbs. 15 oz. Devils Lake 1982
Bluegill 2 lbs. 12 oz. Strawberry Lake 1963
Crappie 3 lbs. 4 oz. Lake Oahe 1998
Crappie 3 lbs. 4 oz. Jamestown Reservoir 2013
White Bass 4 lbs. 10 oz. Devils Lake 2012
Largemouth Bass 8 lbs. 8 oz. Nelson Lake 1983
Smallmouth Bass 6 lbs. 13 oz. Lake Darling 2007
Tiger Muskie 40 lbs. Gravel Lake 1975
Muskellunge 46 lbs. 8 oz. New Johns Lake 2007
Channel Catfish 42 lbs. 1 oz. Moon Lake 2009
Ling 18 lbs. 4 oz. Knife River 1984
Rainbow Trout 21 lbs. 4 oz. Garrison Tailrace 1998
Brown Trout 31 lbs. 11 oz. Garrison Tailrace 2005
Cutthroat Trout 10 lbs. 1 oz. Garrison Tailrace 2003
Lake Trout 16 lbs. 6 oz. Garrison Tailrace 2012
Chinook Salmon 31 lbs. 2 oz. Garrison Tailrace 1986
Paddlefish* 130 lbs. Upper Missouri River 2010
Nongame Fish
Whitefish 8 lbs. 11 oz. Garrison Tailrace 1984
Cisco 2 lbs. 8 oz. Garrison Tailrace 2000
Bullhead 4 lbs. 1 oz. Devils Lake 1988
Drum 26 lbs. 2 oz. Lake Sakakawea 1988
Buffalo 54 lbs. Heart Butte Tailrace 2011
Carp 31 lbs. Sheyenne River 2003
Goldeye 3 lbs. 13 oz. New Johns Lake 1998
Method of take is by hook and line fishing unless marked with * which indicates paddlefish snagging.

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Reporting Tagged Fish

Anglers can help fisheries managers by reporting information from any tagged fish they catch.

 

Most tagged fish in North Dakota, except salmon, will have either a small metal tag attached near the dorsal fin, or a metal tag on their jaw bone (see right). Tagged salmon have their adipose fin removed and also have a microscopic coded wire tag embedded in their head. If you catch a salmon that’s missing its adipose fin, you can drop off the entire head at Game and Fish offices or at bait shops in Riverdale and Pick City.

Salmon Adipose Fin

 

Please treat tagged fish like any other fish – you are not required to release the fish (except where a harvest regulation requires you to do so) or to keep the fish. If you release the fish, do not remove the tag, but do record the information from the tag to report it later. Important information to report includes species, length (inches), when and where the fish was caught, and the tag number/color. Anglers who include their name and address will receive a brief history of the fish they caught from the local fisheries biologist.

There are various means to report a tagged fish. Some tags include a phone number that you can call to report a tag. Other options include a tag reporting page on the Department’s website, sending in a tag reporting card, or simply calling any Department office to report the information over the phone.

Jaw Tag

Fin Tag

 

Tag Reporting Info

 

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Boating Access - Missouri River System and Devils Lake

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Statewide Fishing Waters

Refer to the mobile apps page for a variety of web based mobile maps. These maps provide the latest in fish stocking, lake contours, lake status and driving directions.

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Historical Information

Year(s) Significant Regulation Facts
1895 North Dakota’s Fish Commissioner established a limit of 25 fish.
1911 One line per angler (“line to be held in hand or attached to a rod so held”).
1915 No (ice) fish houses could be used anywhere.
1930 North Dakota Game and Fish Department established.
1931 Possession limit noted twice the daily limit for game fish.
1933 Dumping/releasing of minnows in any waters of North Dakota prohibited.
1950 Ice houses legal but need to be licensed; high grading specifically stated as illegal.
1954 No live fish may be transported in or out of state without written permission from the commissioner; limits only exist for walleye, sauger, northern pike, white bass and black bass.
1955 Minnow traps allowed for the taking of up to 12 dozen minnows; limit of 5 daily/possession established for trout.
1956 Two fishing poles and bow equipment (no game fish) allowed.
1963 Illegal to release any fish back to the water at any time (except for pike with length restrictions) – continued with this wording until 1975.
1964 Class 1 and 2 trout lake delineations established.
1967 Perch eyes became legal bait.
1969 First year underwater spearfishing allowed.
1975 Legal to return game fish to the water immediately after being caught; Missouri River System opened year-round.
1978 Legal to return all fish to the water immediately after being caught; first boat motor restrictions on select lakes.
1990 First free fishing weekend (in June); sturgeon (pallid and shovelnose) could no longer be harvested.
1993 Year-round fishing allowed statewide with the season beginning April 1; limits established for channel catfish, rock bass and burbot, however, no limits for panfish; possession limit double the daily for most species; Special Fish Management Areas replace the “class” trout lake categories; four lines legal for larger water bodies for ice fishing.
1995 Salmon snagging season eliminated.
1996-98 Initial two-year proclamation; first year of a pocketbook guide; trout/salmon stamp eliminated; four lines legal state- wide for ice fishing.
2000-02 Yellow perch (50/250) and crappie (50/100) daily/possession limits established; darkhouse spearfishing allowed in 2001 (28 lakes).
2002-04 Yellow perch and crappie daily limits reduced to 35 (possession 175) – bluegill added to limits (35/175).
2006-08 Each panfish species daily/possession limits further reduced (20/80)
2008-10 New ANS regulations became effective.
2012–14 Liberalized northern pike daily possession limit from 3/6 to 5/10 statewide. Most lakes open to darkhouse spearfishing.